Saturday, March 26, 2011

Coming Next

The excitement has just started. The First Pop Story Opening Contest should be wrapped up early next week, prizes awarded, winners tracked down. (I have an idea who the anonymous writer is, but I'm not sure.) See the blog at
http://www.americanpoplit.blogspot.com/

Immediately after, a new game at Pop Lit will begin-- one requiring participation from everyone. You will not want to miss it.

Also, I hope to begin selling ebooks right from this blog as early as next week-- mine and select others. I plan for this to become Ebook Central for independent, DIY lit-- no conglomerates wanted, thank you-- where you will not only be able to order real cutting edge literature-- not the phony academy kind-- done in the new Pop Art Lit style, but also get the latest insights on where the literary art, and the literary system, are headed. Of course your input on these matters will be desired.

The future of literature is right here, right now.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

What say ye now, Kingy baby?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/books/amanda-hocking-sells-book-series-to-st-martins-press.html?_r=1&hpw

King said...

Er, you're repeating yourself.
Why would I not love this news?
RCA buying Elvis didn't alter the rock revolution one bit. They were simply quicker to move to survive against a coming tsunami of change in their industry then were other giants-- the same kind of change hitting publishing now.

Anonymous said...

"Er, you're repeating yourself."

Er, that's rich, coming from you, the biggest broken-record on the Internet.

"Why would I not love this news?
RCA buying Elvis didn't alter the rock revolution one bit."

Yes, everyone knows the quality of Elvis' music improved dramatically after he left Sun Records for RCA.

"They were simply quicker to move to survive against a coming tsunami of change in their industry then were other giants"

It's THAN, not THEN, O savior of literature.

King said...

Wow. I guess you really told me.
Pat yourself on the back. You've justified yourself to literature by spotting a typo on a comment to a blog post. The bureaucratic mindset at work.
By the way, that the slickness and polish of Presley's music increased, and its gritty authenticity declined, after he left tiny Sun Records, surely isn't much of an argument in favor of the giants.
After he left the army he was given singing lessons. They had him singing near-opera! ("It's Now or Never" "Surrender.")It wasn't the same ol' Elvis-- but hey, the record bureaucrats were happy because at least he was hitting the right notes!